Posts Tagged 'weston counselor'

Halloween Safety

Happy Halloween!  This time of the year people dress cute, friendly, sexy, and scary. It’s the time for you to act wild and crazy and have fun but most of all- collect lots of candy.  As a child, I remember the thrill was to see who could collect the most candy in their bag.  However, being outside going door to door can be a safety risk as well. Here are some safety tips to follow.  Remember… HAVE FUN & BE SAFE!

Alphabet letter S Swords, knives, and similar costume accessories should be short, soft, and flexible.
Alphabet letter A Avoid trick-or-treating alone. Walk in groups or with a trusted adult.
Alphabet letter F Fasten reflective tape to costumes and bags to help drivers see you.
Alphabet letter E Examine all treats for choking hazards and tampering before eating them. Limit the amount of treats you eat.
Alphabet letter H Hold a flashlight while trick-or-treating to help you see and others see you. Always WALK and don’t run from house to house.
Alphabet letter A Always test make-up in a small area first. Remove it before bedtime to prevent possible skin and eye irritation.
Alphabet letter L Look both ways before crossing the street. Use established crosswalks wherever possible.
Alphabet letter L Lower your risk for serious eye injury by not wearing decorative contact lenses.
Alphabet letter O Only walk on sidewalks whenever possible, or on the far edge of the road facing traffic to stay safe.
Alphabet letter W Wear well-fitting masks, costumes, and shoes to avoid blocked vision, trips, and falls.
Alphabet letter E Eat only factory-wrapped treats. Avoid eating homemade treats made by strangers.
Alphabet letter E Enter homes only if you’re with a trusted adult. Only visit well-lit houses. Don’t stop at dark houses. Never accept rides from strangers.
Alphabet letter N Never walk near lit candles or luminaries. Be sure to wear flame-resistant costumes.

* Safety tips provided by the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention.

Mental Health Awareness Week 2013

This week is Mental Health Awareness Week; Mental health advocates across the country join with others in their communities to sponsor activities, large or small, for public education about mental illness.  I think this is so great to support others and spread the work that people may be suffering and it’s okay and there is nothing wrong with it.  It normalizes it for them so the individual may feel more comfortable to seek the help they may need whether from a family member, a friend, and/or a professional.

I recently heard of a friend from high school who was suffering and did not get the help she needed.  My heart goes out to her family and friends who she touched. People who are suffering don’t realize how much they impoact others and I think it is so important to acknowledge that everyone means something to someone.

“Knowledge is power.” Francis Bacon

 

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